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20-Minute Vegan Miso Soup

This delicious Vegan Miso Soup is chock full of wholesome ingredients and can be on the dinner table in about 20-minutes flat!

overhead photo of large bowl of miso soup with tofu and mushrooms with white asian soup spoon

If you love miso soup but have been afraid that it would be difficult to make, you’re in luck! This amazingly healthy vegan soup is made with a combination of mushrooms, tofu, miso, seaweed, and vegetables and takes only minutes to prepare.

3 blue green bowls of miso soup on dark cutting board

You’ll love vegan miso soup because it’s…

  • Bursting with savory miso flavor
  • Full of veggies
  • Has calcium-packed tofu
  • Can be ready in minutes
  • Delicious
  • Healthy

What is miso paste?

Miso paste is a traditional Japanese food that can be found in the refrigerated section of many grocery stores as well as natural food stores and Asian markets. It is commonly called soybean paste and has a mellow, slightly sweet flavor.

Miso is delicious used in soups like this as well as some other recipes like salad dressings and sauces.

miso container with scoop of miso paste on measuring spoon

What is miso soup?

Miso soup is a Japanese soup made with miso paste and additional ingredients like mushrooms, tofu, and other vegetables.

Miso soup is such a warm and comforting dish. It has savory bites of tofu, seaweed, and broccoli in every scoop which makes it naturally vegan.

I completely understand why in Japan it’s even eaten for breakfast. It makes a lot of sense when we consider their historically low cancer and chronic disease rates. They are eating bowls of health to start the day, whereas in the United States we are serving up greasy breakfast sandwiches and sugar-coated cereals.

Overhead photo of 3 white bowls of miso soup with chopsticks

How to make vegan miso soup

Even reluctant cooks will have success with this recipe. If you have a pot and a few items from the grocery store, this savory soup can be in bowls in your kitchen in no time.

Begin by pouring the veggie broth into a large soup pot, and bringing it to a boil. Remove from heat, add the dried mushrooms, cover, and let stand 20 minutes or until mushrooms have softened. If using fresh mushrooms, you can skip this soaking part.

large red stockpot with dried mushrooms and veggie broth

Remove the rehydrated mushrooms from broth with a slotted spoon. Cut off and discard the mushroom stems. Thinly slice the caps and set them aside.

If you make your own veggie stock, the stems would be perfect to add to your scrap bag in the freezer.

I also sometimes buy dried mushrooms that are already sliced thin, which makes this recipe (and others) come together even faster because there’s no need to slice and destem the mushrooms.

cutting board with dried mushrooms and bowl of dried mushrooms

While the mushrooms are soaking is a perfect time to go ahead prep all of the veggies and other ingredients that need to be chopped, sliced, and grated.

I like to slice the broccoli into small bite-sized florets and grate the carrots. However, if you want to just purchase a bag of julienne carrots already prepped, that would eliminate another step for this recipe.

grated carrots with grater on wooden cutting board with broccoli

You will also want to go ahead and grate the fresh ginger. If you only have dry ground ginger on hand, that can work in this recipe, but I really enjoy the flavor of fresh.

Two options for draining and pressing tofu

The tofu will need to be drained and pressed before using in this (or any other) recipe. Making sure the water is removed allows the tofu to have room to soak up the flavors and spices being used.

Traditional way 

Slit the package and drain excess water over a sink. Next, place the tofu block in a tofu press if you have one. Allow 15-30 minutes for pressing.

tofu block being pressed on wooden board with black cast iron pan on top

Homemade press way 

Place tofu on an absorbent surface such as layered paper towels or a dishtowel. Use another dish towel or paper towels to place on top of the block and top with a heavy plate or cast iron pan. Continue to drain under pressure for approximately 30 minutes.

Once the tofu is ready, slice it into 1/4″ cubes. Then, cut the nori sheet into 1″ squares using scissors.

Helpful hint: if your nori has become softened over time and needs to be crisped back up, simply hold the sheet over the heat of a stove eye or a toaster for about 30 seconds. It will become crunchy and crisp again.

grated ginger on cutting board with nori

Add the tofu, nori, and ginger to the broth in the pot. Bring to a simmer and cook for 3 minutes.

Add the mushrooms, broccoli, and carrots. Cover and simmer for 1 minute, just until the broccoli turns bright green.

Preparing the miso broth

You’ll need to break the miso paste down into a broth before adding it to the soup. To do this, transfer 1 cup of the broth from the pot of veggies into a bowl.

miso in veggie broth in bowl with whisk on cutting board with diced tofu

Stir in the miso with a whisk or fork until it is completely dissolved. Pour the dissolved miso into the soup and stir until it is well incorporated. There is no need to cook the soup anymore.

Serve immediately while warm.

3 white bowls of miso soup with chopsticks

Tips & suggestions for this recipe

  • Dry ground ginger can be used in place of fresh ginger, but I think the fresh grated ginger add so much flavor.
  • Be sure to drain and press the water from your tofu as described above. If the tofu is left full of the water it was packaged in, it won’t be able to soak up the miso and ginger as it should.
  • This soup can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1-week.
  • Nearly all of the ingredients needed for this Japanese Miso Soup Recipe can be found at your local Asian market, and for a much cheaper price than shopping at specialty stores.

For those concerned about the salt in miso, this short 3-minute video Is Miso Healthy from Dr. Michael Greger with Nutritionfacts.org should help relieve concerns.

Recipe from The Cancer Survivors Guide by Dr. Neal Barnard.

*Originally published July 2016.

Other great vegan soup recipes

overhead photo of large bowl of miso soup with tofu and mushrooms with white asian soup spoon

Vegan Miso Soup in 20-Minutes

Yield: 5 servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

This delicious vegan miso soup is chock full of wholesome ingredients and can be on the dinner table in about 20-minutes flat!

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Pour the veggie broth into a large soup pot and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, add the dried mushrooms, cover, and let stand 20 minutes, or until mushrooms have softened. If using fresh mushrooms, you can skip this soaking part.
  2. Remove the rehydrated mushrooms from broth with a slotted spoon. Cut off and discard the mushroom stems. Thinly slice the caps and set aside. If you make your own veggie stock, the stems would be perfect to add to your scrap bag in the freezer.
  3. I also sometimes buy dried mushrooms that are already sliced thin, which makes this recipe (and others) come together even faster because there’s no need to slice the mushrooms.
  4. I like to slice the broccoli into small bite-sized florets and grate carrots. However, if you want to just purchase a bag of julienne carrots already prepped, that would eliminate another step for this recipe.
  5. You will also want to go ahead and grate the fresh ginger. If you only have dry ground ginger on hand, that can work in this recipe, but I really enjoy the flavor of fresh.
  6. The tofu will need to be drained and pressed before using in this (or any other) recipe. Making sure the water is removed allows the tofu to have room to soak up the flavors and spices being used. I describe two options for draining and pressing tofu in the article above.
  7. Once the tofu is ready, slice it into 1/4″ cubes. Then, cut the nori sheet into 1″ squares using scissors.. Helpful hint: if your nori has become softened over time and needs to be crisped back up, simply hold the sheet over the heat of a stove eye or a toaster for about 30 seconds. It will become crunch and crisp again.
  8. Add tofu, nori, and ginger to the broth. Bring to a simmer and cook for 3 minutes.
  9. Add the mushrooms, broccoli, and carrots. Cover and simmer for 1 minute, just until the broccoli turns bright green.
  10. You’ll need to need to break the miso paste down into a broth before adding it to the soup. To do this, transfer 1 cup of the broth from the pot of veggies into a bowl. Stir in the miso with a whisk or fork until it is completely dissolved. Pour the dissolved miso into the soup and stir until it is well incorporated. There is no need to cook the soup anymore.
  11. Serve immediately.
  12. Stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, it will keep up to 1 week.

Notes

Detailed instructions, in-process photos, and my personal helpful tips can be found in the article above.

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Nutrition Information:
Yield: 5
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 92Total Fat: 2.8gFiber: 5.4gProtein: 2.8g

To obtain the most accurate representation of the nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator. You are solely responsible for ensuring that any nutritional information provided is accurate, complete, and useful.

Did you make this recipe?

Please rate and leave a comment because I love hearing from you. Remember SHARING IS CARING!

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Marianna

Monday 22nd of March 2021

Just made this soup and it is delicious !! Definitely takes quite a bit longer than 20 minutes if you need to slice,grate, cut everything yourself but it’s well worth the effort !!!!

Ann Leenhouts-Shane

Tuesday 7th of January 2020

Hi Teri! Love your site! Love the new "Jump to Recipe" button. This would be great to have in the freezer for the dreaded cold/flu! Is there anyway to get sodium counts on your recipes? My husband is on low sodium diet after quad bypass last summer. Thanks! Ann

Terri Edwards

Tuesday 7th of January 2020

Hi Ann, I am so glad that you like the new 'Jump to Recipe' button. It does make getting to the recipe much quicker. Just be sure to check out the tips and special instructions in the text as well because that's where I include lots more of the details for the recipes. A few of my recipes have sodium listed, but not the majority of them. For this particular one, Dr. Michael Greger has some great information on sodium in miso and how it's different. This is his video if you want to give it a peek. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-miso-healthy/

Tara Bernier

Sunday 13th of January 2019

It says use silken tofu in the ingredient list and then in the instructions it says to cut tofu into cubes. May want to change ingredient list to firm tofu.

Janet

Sunday 13th of January 2019

Hi. I've never made miso but I have all the ingredients except the mushrooms. I'm confused about what to buy. You seem to equate the amount of fresh vs dried, calling for a cup of either. But isn't a cup of dried, when rehydrated, a lot more in volume than a cup of fresh? At such a high price compared to button mushrooms or baby bellas, I'm not sure that I can afford of cup of dried shitake. Please clarify. Thank you!

EatPlant-Based.com

Monday 14th of January 2019

Janet, yes, the one cup of mushrooms does mean fresh or rehydrated from dry. So, you'll want 1-cup of rehydrated mushrooms if you're using dry. It's also really just a preference, as the amount can be changed to suit personal tastes. Major mushroom-lovers might add more, and others might add less. Hope you enjoy the soup!

Kara

Wednesday 28th of November 2018

Will this freeze well?

EatPlant-Based.com

Wednesday 28th of November 2018

I haven't tried freezing it. To be honest, I just had to look it up. It appears miso soup can be frozen in airtight containers for up to 6 months. Interesting!

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